Archive for December, 2007

Darwins Theory of Diesel Performance

December 24, 2007
If Darwin himself were alive today, I dare say that he would be driving a diesel. No other engine out there has more perfectly illustrated his theories of evolution than the diesel.  Now as true as it might be that diesels were once known for being the “slow and smelly” vehicles on the road, car makers as well as several aftermarket performance companies have set out on a mission to put an end to that reputation.  With the additions of a turbo or multiple turbos (i.e. ’08 Powerstroke) and intercooler(s) as well as diesel performance intakes, diesel performance chips/modules and exhaust systems the reputation once held by diesels is now evolving, Darwin would be so proud.So why diesel performance? In the past there never really was a question as to which “species” was more dominant when it came to performance. It has not been until recently that there has even needed to be a debate as to which is better, gas performance or diesel performance and even today you will have people try to argue that gas performance is where it is at but I am here to say that not only is there more horsepower available for the money when it comes to performance products for diesels but you will have longer engine life as well as maintain if not increased fuel mileage.One of the strongest points in the argument for Diesel Performance is the fact that you can add engine mods to a diesel engine and it won’t harm the engine or make it burn hotter to the extent of damaging the engine permanently. Don’t get me wrong you can still fry your engine but diesel engines are built much stronger and much more durable. One of the main reasons that diesel engines are so durable or will last longer in general is the way that combustion occurs in the engine. Diesel engines “fire” or “combust” differently than gas engines mainly because of the type of fuel that is used. In gasoline engines a spark plug is used to combust the fuel but in a diesel combustion occurs mainly due to the temperature of the compressed air which causes the fuel to ignite. Because of this diesel engines are built more durable because they have a higher compression ratios (20:1 for a typical diesel vs. 8:1 for a typical gasoline engine) it is being built to withstand this higher compression that makes these engines more ready for performance modifications straight from the factory.

As the diesel engine has evolved over the years turbo chargers have been added to increase power as well as increase diesel fuel mileage, this has made way for huge increases in horsepower both stock as well as with the addition of after market products. One of the main reasons that diesel performance is so much more viable is the fact that because the engine is built for a higher compression ratio anyway so it is going to be able to withstand the boost that is created by a turbo much better than a gasoline engine, also allowing the addition of performance modifications without shortening the life of the engine as usually happens with gasoline engines when performance mods are added.

Like it or not diesel performance is here to stay, and whether or not you believe in evolution it’s happening and will continue to happen in the diesel performance market. Don’t be surprised when you see good old Darwin himself roll past you on the street in his tweaked out diesel.

Diesel performance evolution starts with a strong base of upgrades, not just any diesel performance part will do. – Nathan Young

Visit Parley’s Diesel Performance for all your diesel performance part needs.

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Is Diesel Performance Dead?

December 24, 2007
In a day where phrases like Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel, Exhaust Gas Recirculation, Urea Injection and most of all Diesel Particulate Filter are being used in an industry that is more accustomed to phrases like “Boost Fooler” and “Mufflerectomy”, many people are wondering if this is the end of the diesel performance era. Many people are even asking, “Is Diesel Performance dead?” Now there are a couple of different ways to approach this question and with a topic so close to many people’s hearts it’s oftentimes very difficult to know which way is the best to approach the subject.For many people that have voiced their opinions about the stringent standards that the EPA is putting on Car Manufacturers this is the end of an era; much like the end of the muscle car era.  There are many people saying that January 2007 was much like January 1972, marking the end of what is being a called the “Diesel Performance Era” just like 1972 is looked on as the official end of the Muscle Car Era.  If you take a step back and compare the two “Era’s” there are a couple of similarities, those being mainly the race to see which company can make more frame wrenching horsepower and torque after decades of research and development and then also being shut down by the EPA and new emissions laws.

So where do we go from here? Is that the end of diesel? Will the even tighter restrictions that will be enforced in 2010 be so smothering that automakers decide to abandone diesel lines altogether?  Well as of right now, all signs actually point to a bright future in the diesel arena itself.  Several automakers are talking about adding diesel engines to their lineup including Honda who has a diesel Accord set to enter the market in 2009 and there are rumors of Toyota adding a diesel option to their Tundra, but guys can only hope right?

If we look again at the parallels between the two eras we can see a bright glimpse of hope for the diesel performance aftermarket in a couple of different ways.  Since the end of the muscle car era in 1972, aftermarket performance has definitely changed.  Even more so in the past decade with just the upload of a program from a diesel performance programmer you can be 100 horsepower or more above stock in just a matter of minutes.  That is definitely a far cry from the performance modifications of old.  It’s my guess, and take it for what you will, but I see the diesels of the last decade or so becoming much like the muscle cars of the 60’s and 70’s, sort of the last of the fun vehicles, less restriction and more possibilities for big power. Although new diesels will continue to increase more and more in power, I think that the new restrictions are going to make it even more difficult for manufacturers to create programmers, chips, intakes etc. that will work without setting off check engine lights and throwing codes etc.

So in the end I say that the future looks bright for diesel vehicles as a whole.  As for diesel performance, if you have a 1994-2006 diesel, either hold onto it or give me a call–because the value is going to increase, just watch and see. – Nathan Young

Nathan Young is a diesel performance enthusiast.  His main areas of interest in the industry are VW TDI performance and diesel performance chips.

Visit Parley’s Diesel Performance for all your diesel performance part upgrades.

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Diesel Performance Chips – The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread

December 21, 2007
Diesel performance chips have evolved over the last decade or so that they have been in use, and have vastly gained popularity. The reason for their evolution and following is because the diesel performance chips are able to dramatically increase power and I mean dramatically. There are diesel performance chips that can increase performance as much as 230 horse power and 400 foot pounds of torque. That is almost as much power as some of the diesel trucks come with bone stock. There are three ways that diesel performance chips are able to create power and improve economy.The first way that I will discuss that the diesel performance chips are able to increase power and economy is through duration. Duration means that the injectors are held open longer so that more fuel can be injected into the cylinder. More fuel equals more power. Diesel performance chips that use duration are not a good choice to increase diesel fuel mileage, but it does create large amounts of power.The second way is timing. Timing means that the fuel is injected earlier. Timing when used correctly also adds a great amount of power and adds to economy. The goal of timing on diesel performance chips is to get the fuel in the cylinder at a more efficient time. If that is accomplished then more power is extracted from each molecule of fuel.

The third way that diesel performance chips increase power and economy is through pressure. Pressure means that the fuel rails line pressure is increased, so more fuel is injected which creates more power, but at the same time having more pressure to the fuel when it gets to the injector helps it to create a finer mist or atomize as the fuel exits the several little holes in the injector tip. This improved atomization also helps the fuel to mix better with the air that enters the cylinder and is able to extract more power out of the fuel.

Many of the diesel performance chips, modules, boxes, tuners, and the like use a combination of two of these techniques, and some use all of them. So essentially by adding more fuel and improving the way the engine burns the fuel and especially the increased amount of fuel, the diesel performance chips can dramatically increase power and economy.

Diesel performance chips are your basic entry level diesel performance upgrade. – Nathan Young

Shop Parley’s Diesel Performance for all your diesel performance upgrades.

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VW TDI Performance – Building The Beast

December 20, 2007

As with building up any vehicle for power, Volkswagen TDI performance starts with making the basic modifications first.  The VW TDI will get its biggest two gains out of a TDI performance chip or module and out of upgraded injectors. Your average chip or module upgrade will give about a 20% power increase. A tdi injector upgrade usually yields about a 20% gain as well.  If the right combination of TDI chip/module and injectors are used, even more will be gained, i.e. (Van Aaken Smartbox & Van Aaken Smart Power Nozzles). Those are the most basic VW TDI performance upgrades.

Another basic VW TDI performance modification is the TDI performance exhaust. If you are going to increase fueling you will in turn increase EGT’s (exhaust gas temperatures). So to keep temperatures lower and to help increase performance of the VW TDI even more, one of two things can be done; first, a mufflerectomy can be performed, in which the muffler and resonator are removed and a straight pipe is put in their place. This opens things up a little and removes the baffling of the muffler so that the exhaust can flow more freely. The second TDI exhaust option is the Aero Exhaust turbine muffler. The inner design of Aero Exhaust’s performance muffler works the same as a jet engine to increase the flow of exhaust even more than what a mufflerectomy does. The inner design splits the air via an air foil. The faster air moves through the center and the slower air moves around the outside of the air foil, the slower moving air then re-enters the main air stream through inlets that go down the sides of the mufflers inner cylinder. This recombining creates a vortex that lowers the tone of the exhaust and dramatically reduces back pressure by increasing the flow of all the exhaust that moves through it.

Increasing air flow into the engine will help more of the fuel to be combusted and to help extract more power out of each molecule of fuel. Most diesel cold air intakes have a large cone air filter that is able to move up to 300% more air than the stock air intake system. This makes the cold air intake an important part of any VW TDI performance package, sadly though, cold air intakes are not currently made for all the vw tdi models. Another modification that helps with air intake and exhaust is water methanol injection. Water methanol injection is also known as chemical intercooling. It has a three fold effect on the diesel engine. First, it cools the intake charge which provides for more available air intake and the benefits of a higher positive pressure ratio (more power giving fuel can be utilized safely without high combustion temperatures). Two, the combustion of water also adds power.  Third, methanol is also a high octane fuel that adds more power. Water methanol injection typically lowers EGT’s by about 200 to 250 degrees on bigger diesels and is slightly under that for the VW TDI.

So in conclusion, to be able to build a real beast, the modifications must be made from the ground up.  After these mods are made then a bigger turbo and intercooler could be added as well as upgrading the clutch and other components to help hold the added power.

The TDI Chip and TDI Exhaust are the beginning of any VW TDI Performance upgrade. – Nathan Young

Visit Parleys Diesel Performance for all your diesel performance part needs.

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Exhaust Stacks and Fine Chocolate.

December 20, 2007

Over the past couple years diesel exhaust stacks have gained more and more popularity.  The most popular manufacturer of these chrome exhaust stacks is Grand Rock Exhaust.  Our loyal customers we have been placing plenty of orders of Grand Rock Exhaust stack kits over the past couple years, so as a thank you, they sent us a box of chocolates for the holiday season.  We thought one of them was really cool; so we decided to snap a picture and pass the thank you onto all of our loyal and repeat customers.

Thank you for making Parley’s Diesel Performance your choice when shopping for performance diesel part upgrades.

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PPE Diesel Xcelerator by Pacific Performance Engineering

December 20, 2007

One of the new lines that we are carrying at Parley’s Diesel Performance is the PPE Diesel Product line including the very popular PPE Xcelerator.  Although the PPE Xcelerator is most popular in the Duramax performance crowd Pacific Performance Engineering offers a excellent selection of Cummins Performance and Powerstroke Performance that offer incredible performance gains as high as 300hp (at the flywheel) as well as allow you to check codes, get rid of defueling, and remove the speed delimter.  If you are looking for some serious power and don’t mind paying a little more than a typical diesel tuner, it is worth every penny.  The Diesel Programmers from PPE Diesel offer ten different power settings similar to the Smarty Tuner for the Cummins.

CFM+ Putting The CFM Plus To The Test

December 11, 2007

So the good people at CFM+ wanted us to take a look and tell them what we think of their new Cummins performance intake manifold.  We have been pretty excited to get this beast on our 05 Cummins project vehicle but have been waiting for the 3 hole tapped CFM+ drilled and tapped version to be released.  Now that it is, we have one in hand and should have it installed and being tested within the week so keep posted.  For those of you not familiar with CFM Plus’ intake manifolds, they differ from other cummins performance intake manifold in a couple of different ways.  First, they are made of composite material instead of cast aluminium which helps greatly for keeping tempratures down and second, instead of just going for a larger diameter like you see on the ATS Arcflow and the Banks setup they went with a better design that allowed them to flow more air and get the studs out of the way.

Let us know if you have any questions and be sure to visit Parley’s Diesel Performance for all your diesel performance part needs.

Here are some pictures:

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What Makes The Aero Exhaust Tick?

December 11, 2007

A lot of people are wondering what makes the Aero Turbine Muffler so special and what sets it apart from other performance mufflers on the market.  Aero Exhaust was good enough to provide this cutout so that we could show our clients what the internals of these revolutionary mufflers look like.

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The Aero Turbine Muffler is based on jet engine and thermaldynamic technology. The incoming exhaust airstream is rapidly expanded and split via an airfoil cone with an orifice similar to a jet engine. The outer airstream accelerates as it recombines with the inner airstream. The air then begins to spin, due to the velocity and air transfers. The recombining of the airstreams creates a vacuum that both muffles the exhaust sound and increases the exhaust flow. This allows your engine to breath easier and dramatically increases your vehicles performance and economy.

Shop Parley’s Diesel Performance for all your diesel exhaust upgrade needs.

John Deere Tractor Performance Chip

December 11, 2007

So what is a guy to do when he has put a diesel performance chip on all his daily drivers? Start chipping his equipment with the aid of TS Performance Agri-Power Series of course. TS Performance offers a wide selection of awesome power enhancers for tractors from John Deere, Case, Catepillar and more that will help increase your economy and performance between 20-30%. If you are wondering if TS has a diesel performance chip for your application, just take a look at this list to see all of the makes that TS Performance makes chips for.

  • 02-05 20 Series 8.1L JD
  • 06 30 Series 9.0L JD
  • 06-07 Sisu Common Rail Tier III
  • 06-07 Sisu Common Rail Tier III
  • 02-05 8.3 w/CAPS Fuel System
  • 06-07 8.3, 5.9, 6.7 Comm Rail
  • 06-07 Common Rail
  • 8.3 Common Rail
  • 7.4 & 8.4 Common Rail
  • 8.3L CAPS Fuel System CASE
  • 8.3L & 9.0L Common Rail CASE
  • 06-07 7.4, 8.4 Common Rail
  • 9.0L CAT Challenger Tractor

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Also, be sure to check out the TS Performance Chips for Medium Duty and RV Performance applications by visiting Parley’s Diesel Performance.

Smarty Tuner Anyone?

December 8, 2007

So I finally convinced the buying department that is was time to start carrying the Smarty Tuner by MADS Electronics.  Now don’t get me wrong, I wasn’t pushing the buying department to buy in because I have a lot of experience with the Smarty Tuner;  I just know what it is capable of and as soon as I finish my tranny buildup, I know it’s the diesel tuner that I will want running on my Cummins.

The Smarty comes with 10 settings which offer huge power gains–up to 230hp!  In my opnion the Smarty Tuner is the closest thing to EFI Live for the Cummins (that is until the Van Aaken C5 software is released!) Here are the main selling points for the Smarty:

 

  • DTC (Diagnostic Trouble Codes) reader with on-screen plain text
    interpretation of the codes.
  • ABS programming for tire height adjustment.
  • Upgrades through built in USB connector
  • Automatic recovery of the ECM in case of an interrupted update.  
  • 3.5 – 6 minutes required to update ECM depending on truck model
  • Programmable speed limiter

 

 

Go ahead and check it out for yourself and if you have any questions let us know. Be sure to shop Parley’s Diesel Performance for all your Cummins performance needs.
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